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You’re Invited

HR Club and Shirlaws Presents 360 – Friend or Foe?

Date – Tuesday 13 September 2011

Time – 5:30pm for 6pm

Venue – The Delany Hotel, Darby St Cooks Hill

Click here  http://360friendorfoe.eventbrite.com/  to secure your place.

Join us upstairs in the function room of The Delany Hotel for a forum on 360 degree feedback. Is it a useful tool or could it be your worst HR nightmare?

Greg Lourey and Adelle Richards of The Leadership Circle will be presenting their thoughts and answering your questions. 

                      

Register now as places are limited.

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You’re Invited

HR Club Newcastle presents…

 “What the #@!^% is Coaching and do we need to know about it in HR?”

 Date- Wednesday 1 June 2011

Time- 5:30pm for 6pm

Venue- The Delany Hotel, Darby St Cooks Hill

Join us upstairs in the function room of The Delany Hotel for a panel discussion on Coaching moderated by Olivia O’Brien and Jenny Roberts.

Find out: What is it? How is it used? What are the costs and benefits? How to coach and be coached.

Our panel will be made up of Hunter based Executive, Personal and Business coaches who will share with you their insights, offer suggestions and action plans and answer your toughest questions. Register now as places are limited.

Click here to REGISTER NOW!

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aaaaand we’re back!

Hi all,

Well after a very busy end of year….. HR Club Newcastle is back on deck and ready to roll for our second year of action, events and excitment! So get ready for bigger and better things from us in 2011.

Details of our first event for the year are being brewed by the team and we look forward to sharing it all with you soon.

In the meantime, hit up our discussion board on Linked In for more sharing, learning, venting 😉 and lots of HRing!

Looking forward to another great year of HR Club with you all. Thanks again for your support in 2010.

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Event Update!

Important Update: HR Club Newcastle Presents – Newcastle Business Leaders Panel

Due to unforeseen circumstances, some of our panel members for Wednesday night event have been revised. We will however, aim to play host to Mark Fitzgibbon and Sue Mather at a later date.

Panel:

Peter Shinnick – CEO, Hunter Business Chamber

Melanie Kneale – Chief Operating & Technology Officer, NIB Health Funds

Samantha Alford – General Manager Operations and Administration, Scenic and Evergreen Tours

Peter, Melanie and Samantha are all exceptional business leaders in our community with defferent experiences and perspectives when it comes to HR. I look forward to hearing their ideas about how leaders and HR can work better together.

IMPORTANT – Questions for the Panel!

 We have had a few good questions sent in so far for the panel – please send yours to hrclubnewcastle@gmail.com or post it in the comments section below.

 See you at Noah’s on Wednesday night 5:30pm for a 6pm sharp start!

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Panel Complete!

I can now confirm that Sue Mather will be the third and final panellist for our Hunter Business Leaders Panel at the next HR Club Newcastle Event!

Details for your Diary

Date: Wednesday 19 May 2010.

Time: 6pm.

Venue: The Promenade Room, Noah’s on the Beach.

Invitations for this event will be sent through LinkedIn so if you aren’t already a member of the group get LinkedIn  HERE and you will be added to the invitation mailing list.

HR Club Newcastle Hunter Business Leaders Panel

Sue Mather – Director of Corporate Services, Life Without Barriers

Sue has a background in Industrial Relations and Human Resources, mainly in the Financial Services and Pharmaceutical industries. Prior to joining Life Without Barriers she was Executive General Manager, People & Performance, for Suncorp Metway in Brisbane for six years and undertook other corporate services and line management roles in her career up to that point.

Sue is passionate about  people, their relationships with each other, with their clients and key stakeholders. Her focus is to support the people who are supporting the clients, to contribute to their development and fulfilment and to help create a vibrant environment in which both the individual and the organisation can thrive and be successful.

Sue holds a Bachelor of Economics and has completed the Advanced Human Resources Executive Development Program.

Mark Fitzgibbon – CEO, nib 

 

nib Chief Executive Officer, Mark Fitzgibbon joined nib in 2002 with a mandate to reposition the company to better meet future challenges. Since 2002 nib has increased its membership by almost 70% and revenue by more than 100%.

Today, nib covers nationwide over a quarter of a million people and has annual revenue of over $800 million. In November 2007 nib became the first private health insurer in the country to list on the ASX.

Mark has a Masters in Business Administration and Masters in Arts. He is a fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and is a Director of the Australian Health Insurance Association.

Peter Shinnick – CEO, Hunter Business Chamber

 

 Peter Shinnick is the Chief Executive Officer of the Hunter Business Chamber, a position he has filled since January 2008. Prior to that Peter spent six years as the General Manager of the Hunter Valley Training Company, the largest private Group Training company in NSW with over 1400 employees and 100 staff.During his six years with that company Peter increased turnover from $25 to $60 million, and gained many large contracts including the Australian Technical College Hunter.

Peter has a number of qualifications including a Bachelor of Science, Graduate Diploma in Applied Science and a Master of Business Administration. He is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

So be sure to SAVE THE DATE in your diary !

 

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Trust me, I’m a Professional…

How does trust affect your workplace? Your HR function? Your HR Team?

Is it just being able to count on someone to do what they say? Or is it organisational i.e. is yours a trusted organisation? Do things happen as promised, is communication transparent?

Trust, to me, is crucial in the working relationship and the key to trust, is emotional intelligence… but I’ll let Jason Roberts (our first ever guest blogger!) tell you about that in a moment.

I’ve recently been re-reading Stephen M.R Covey’s (ok, ok I’m a fan) The Speed of Trust and it’s put all sorts of crazy and wonderful ideas in my head about the possibilities of using trust as the main component in HR. Obviously keeping confidence and being trust worthy are integral to any HR role, but how can we use this to ensure best practice?

Decisions are made faster, initiatives launched with more enthusiasm, roadblocks disappear and productivity is higher when high trust relationships exist within organisations.

Trying to implement a new HRIS? Make sure performance reviews are completed? Get honest 360 degree feedback? How much quicker and easier would these be if the people you were dealing with trust you implicitly?

“I don’t need to see the proposal or costing, I’m going to approve your request to implement a whizz bang HRIS because I trust that you have done the research and made the best decision for the business.” Which would be correct 🙂 But hardly realistic!

A working relationship built on trust isn’t about blind faith – real trust is built on two components as Covey says “Confidence” and “Competence”.

Your clients need to know that you work with integrity (you walk the talk, you do what’s right, you are worthy of trust) and that you are capable (you make good decisions, you’re smart, you have the skills required)

So how do we work trust into our relationships as HR practitioners… hmmm… Well the easy bit is self trust. You need to be able to trust yourself to work with integrity and competence. The trickier part is working with others. How do we trust them? How do we know they trust us?

And that brings us to Jason Roberts on Emotional Intelligence (What a segue!!)

Hi Olivia,

Thanks for asking me to share some comments on your blog.

As you’ve pointed out so clearly, trust is essential in any working relationship. Without trust, there can be little cooperation other than that driven by duty or loyalty. Without willing and interested cooperation, staff is merely a collection of individuals, slotted into a timetable, whose dynamic is limited to following directions.

So, to your question: what is the role of emotional intelligence in developing trust at work?

It’s a big question, and for the sake of being concise, I am going to focus on two behaviours I routinely see that undermine trust and cause immeasurable damage to an organisation’s bottom line.

The first area concerns how workplace decisions are communicated, and it’s probably best explained by way of a scenario.

A manager – let’s call her Jill – has just been informed of major cutbacks in funding for overtime and some potential redundancies. Naturally, Jill is concerned about these decisions and worries how her staff will take it. To communicate the decision, she invites all the relevant people to a meeting. Jill delivers the facts of the decision in a firm professional business-like manner; making sure upper-management’s decision is supported without question.

Another manger – Robert – is equally concerned about the decision and the way upper-management is handling it. Roberts is ‘one of the troops’ and, as well as communicating the facts of the decision, he shares his disgruntlement and frustration.

These two polarities demonstrate what I call the ‘communist’ and the ‘anarchist’ approaches. While they both communicate the fact that the decision is not negotiable, the first style is very much “comrades, we must follow the party leader”, and the second is “these leaders here are crap and their decisions are rubbish”.

I believe there is a totally incorrect notion that when it comes to communicating difficult decisions in the workplace, leaders have to assume one of these two positions. Unfortunately, neither engenders trust. In fact, both styles create mistrust among staff.

The next most frequent workplace challenge I see that requires trust and emotional intelligence is communicating in an honest and meaningful way when having a ‘hard conversation’ – for example giving poor performance feedback and developing a way forward with a staff member.

Apart from the 70% of people who simply opt out and don’t have the conversation at all, when people do engage in a ‘hard conversation’, I again see polarities arise.

On one hand, feedback and expectations are communicated in a tactless, aggressive, almost bullying style. On the other, I see ‘hard conversations’ delivered in a wishy-washy, fluffy style.

These behaviours are typical of low emotional intelligence in the workplace. Unfortunately they do nothing except create distrust and confusion, and generally the point of the exercise and the opportunity for growth is missed.

So how we do things differently and behave in an emotionally intelligent way to create workplace trust?

I suggest two very simple yet effective approaches.

  1. The development of emotionally intelligent decision-making. A style of communication that communicates both the facts and feelings of all the stakeholders and gains their commitment.
  2. The development of emotionally intelligent, interpersonal communication. Communication that is clear, succinct, tactful, and contains a path forward.

Both of these skills can be taught quickly and easily. Yes, they take practice, but what doesn’t? I have worked with NSW police, Hunter Health, ANZ bank, and dozens of other organisations across the country and seen people from Olympic athletes to corporate mangers and even street-kids develop these skills, and as a result foster trust and growth in their relationships.

Olivia, as you know, workplace emotional intelligence and trust is a deep and complex topic. I’m grateful for this opportunity to share two of the most effective ways it can be developed.

Jason Roberts.

Jason is a Workplace Learning and Development Consultant with more than 15 years experience. He has a Bachelor Degree in Training and Development and Psychology Studies, is a three-times Commonwealth Games medalist and former employee of the South Australian Sport Institute. Informed by research recording the transition from being an elite athlete to a non-sporting life, Jason has a profound understanding of how people manage and deal with change. He has also carried out African wildlife conservation work and in 2005, was an invited judge for the Australian Humanitarian of the Year Award.

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Diary Alert!

Our next HR Club Newcastle event has a date, a venue and two members of our Business Leaders Panel!!!

Hunter Business Leaders Panel

Date: Wednesday 19 May 2010

Time: 6pm

Venue: Quality Hotel Noah’s on the Beach

I’m very excited to announce that two of the most reputable business leaders in Newcastle and the Hunter have agreed to be a part of our panel.

 Mark Fitzgibbon – CEO, nib

nib Chief Executive Officer, Mark Fitzgibbon joined nib in 2002 with a mandate to reposition the company to better meet future challenges. Since 2002 nib has increased its membership by almost 70% and revenue by more than 100%.

Today, nib covers nationwide over a quarter of a million people and has annual revenue of over $800 million. In November 2007 nib became the first private health insurer in the country to list on the ASX.

Mark has a Masters in Business Administration and Masters in Arts. He is a fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and is a Director of the Australian Health Insurance Association.

Peter Shinnick – CEO, Hunter Business Chamber
 Peter Shinnick is the Chief Executive Officer of the Hunter Business Chamber, a position he has filled since January 2008. Prior to that Peter spent six years as the General Manager of the Hunter Valley Training Company, the largest private Group Training company in NSW with over 1400 employees and 100 staff.

During his six years with that company Peter increased turnover from $25 to $60 million, and gained many large contracts including the Australian Technical College Hunter.

Peter has a number of qualifications including a Bachelor of Science, Graduate Diploma in Applied Science and a Master of Business Administration. He is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

So be sure to SAVE THE DATE in your diary and stay tuned for an update on the final panel member!

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